5 Strange fads… made in China

TL;DR – Yes, even these are made in China.

Many things are made out of the Land of the Great Wall these days, some good, so not so good. Today, let’s talk about five of the strangest fads that hail from China. Have you heard about them?

1. China and the Beansprout

This was sometime in the second half of 2015. No one really knows why or how, but people started walking around with a ‘garden’ on their heads. It began with a lone beansprout, then some started wearing a few of these beansprout pins, and before long, people started wearing different variations of all sorts of plants and flowers on their heads.

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I am thankful this fad didn’t find its way to our shores *phew!!*

2. What…?! What Face-kini? This is a Thing?

Hey, don’t run! These are not terrorists!

Yes, as terrorising as they look, these are just Chinese women who have donned protective gear to shield their faces from the sun whilst they frolick in the sun.

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Ermm… with NEA releasing the news about how Singapore could see temperature soaring to some 36 degrees Celsius in the later part of March, would some enterprising Chinese start importing these to sell here?

3. Can You Reach Your Belly Button?

This fad first made news in mid 2015, where young women in China started posting on social media photos of them attempting the belly button challenge.

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Yes, it’s just a way of gloating about how small one’s waist is. Tsk.

4. The Clavicle Challenge

The belly button challenge didn’t last long before the clavicle challenge came along, also around mid 2015. In this one, young women in China attempted to line coins along their collar bones.

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The more coins you can line up along your collar bone, the higher your sexiness factor apparently.

5. The A4 Paper Challenge

This is new and still on-going! This time, it’s about comparing your waist to the width of a piece of A4 paper. Many Chinese women have been attempting this challenge and gleefully putting up photos of their success online.

However, there are voices in some quarters that say these body challenges are unhealthy and can, in fact, be seen as body-shaming the have-not’s, or in this case, the cannot’s.

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We’re talking about 21 cm or 8.27 inches here. O.U.C.H.



Author: Maggie Wang

Hello, I’m probably your most socially awkward cave-woman this part of town. In the day, I work to put wanton mee on the table and chocolate ice-cream in the fridge. At night, I read a lot and write a little.


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